Council commits $2M to turn Hambleton Hall into affordable housing

News Mar 05, 2015 by Yvonne Van De Wiele-Cooper Norfolk News

The organization planning to transform Simcoe’s Hambleton Hall into a total of 40 affordable housing units says the Dean Street property will cater to people on the waiting list who have been diagnosed with a permanent disability and receive disability support from the province.

“Those are really the folks we’re targeting,” Jeff Neven, executive director of Indwell, told council last week.

Councillors voted 5-4 to award the Hamilton-based non-profit organization $2 million toward the cost of converting the former church hall into housing units. Neven said the actual cost of the project is $4.6 million and Indwell will take out a 20-year mortgage to finance the balance.

The 40 units will consist of a combination of one-bedroom and bachelor apartments. Some will be barrier free, meaning they could include grab bars, lower countertops and other features to accommodate residents with disabilities.

The Indwell proposal included a request for an additional $160,000 annual grant to hire two staff for the facility, but Neven stressed that the full strength of Indwell’s resource team will be available to future residents, including 24-hour on-call service.

“We anticipate two staff  there each day but there is a lot more staffing involved in making that work,” Neven said.

The $160,000 per year is expected to come from a provincial homeless prevention program.

Indwell’s director of housing, Graham Cubitt, said his organization is “quite excited to be working with residents and Norfolk County council on solving the affordable housing challenges many people face.”

Armed with council’s approval, county staff will now make a recommendation to the province that the project be funded. A final decision could take a month or more, and new apartments could be ready by 2016.

Haldimand-Norfolk’s manager of social housing, Heidy Van Dyk, said people already on the waiting list for affordable housing would be given first priority for the new units.

Council commits $2M to turn Hambleton Hall into affordable housing

News Mar 05, 2015 by Yvonne Van De Wiele-Cooper Norfolk News

The organization planning to transform Simcoe’s Hambleton Hall into a total of 40 affordable housing units says the Dean Street property will cater to people on the waiting list who have been diagnosed with a permanent disability and receive disability support from the province.

“Those are really the folks we’re targeting,” Jeff Neven, executive director of Indwell, told council last week.

Councillors voted 5-4 to award the Hamilton-based non-profit organization $2 million toward the cost of converting the former church hall into housing units. Neven said the actual cost of the project is $4.6 million and Indwell will take out a 20-year mortgage to finance the balance.

The 40 units will consist of a combination of one-bedroom and bachelor apartments. Some will be barrier free, meaning they could include grab bars, lower countertops and other features to accommodate residents with disabilities.

The Indwell proposal included a request for an additional $160,000 annual grant to hire two staff for the facility, but Neven stressed that the full strength of Indwell’s resource team will be available to future residents, including 24-hour on-call service.

“We anticipate two staff  there each day but there is a lot more staffing involved in making that work,” Neven said.

The $160,000 per year is expected to come from a provincial homeless prevention program.

Indwell’s director of housing, Graham Cubitt, said his organization is “quite excited to be working with residents and Norfolk County council on solving the affordable housing challenges many people face.”

Armed with council’s approval, county staff will now make a recommendation to the province that the project be funded. A final decision could take a month or more, and new apartments could be ready by 2016.

Haldimand-Norfolk’s manager of social housing, Heidy Van Dyk, said people already on the waiting list for affordable housing would be given first priority for the new units.

Council commits $2M to turn Hambleton Hall into affordable housing

News Mar 05, 2015 by Yvonne Van De Wiele-Cooper Norfolk News

The organization planning to transform Simcoe’s Hambleton Hall into a total of 40 affordable housing units says the Dean Street property will cater to people on the waiting list who have been diagnosed with a permanent disability and receive disability support from the province.

“Those are really the folks we’re targeting,” Jeff Neven, executive director of Indwell, told council last week.

Councillors voted 5-4 to award the Hamilton-based non-profit organization $2 million toward the cost of converting the former church hall into housing units. Neven said the actual cost of the project is $4.6 million and Indwell will take out a 20-year mortgage to finance the balance.

The 40 units will consist of a combination of one-bedroom and bachelor apartments. Some will be barrier free, meaning they could include grab bars, lower countertops and other features to accommodate residents with disabilities.

The Indwell proposal included a request for an additional $160,000 annual grant to hire two staff for the facility, but Neven stressed that the full strength of Indwell’s resource team will be available to future residents, including 24-hour on-call service.

“We anticipate two staff  there each day but there is a lot more staffing involved in making that work,” Neven said.

The $160,000 per year is expected to come from a provincial homeless prevention program.

Indwell’s director of housing, Graham Cubitt, said his organization is “quite excited to be working with residents and Norfolk County council on solving the affordable housing challenges many people face.”

Armed with council’s approval, county staff will now make a recommendation to the province that the project be funded. A final decision could take a month or more, and new apartments could be ready by 2016.

Haldimand-Norfolk’s manager of social housing, Heidy Van Dyk, said people already on the waiting list for affordable housing would be given first priority for the new units.