B-FLIX drops sophomore album

News Nov 13, 2015 by J.P. Antonacci Norfolk News

B-FLIX is back.

The Boston rapper, also known as 22-year-old Brent Flicks, has a new album and a new tattoo, both of which were on display at the rec centre in Simcoe Saturday night.

The album, Genuine, delivers 14 tracks that showcase Flicks’ hip-hop/R&B sensibilities while conveying his raw take on social justice issues and his personal struggles with spinal muscular atrophy.

The tattoo, on his left hand, is the word “breathe,” the B rendered as a stylized musical note.

“I breathe music,” Flicks said, explaining that his condition – which has forced him to use a wheelchair since the age of three – can make breathing difficult.

“(The tattoo) kinda reminds me that as long as I’m breathing, I can do music.”

His music tells his story of not letting a degenerative disease derail his passion.

“It was from the heart,” Flicks said of Genuine, which is available now on iTunes and through bflix.ca.

“All my music is just my hopes and dreams, where I’ve been and where I hope to be. Some people have said it really makes them think and gives them a different perspective.”

His debut album, Everything Changed, scored Flicks a Hamilton Music Award nomination for rap/hip-hop recording of the year, and an invite to join a hip hop showcase at Club Absinthe in Hamilton before the awards night in May.

Flicks takes the accolades in stride. “Music gives me something to focus on. It gives me some sort of purpose, at whatever level it is,” he said.

His career has also introduced him to a wider circle of musicians, such as producer Shane McCurdy and the many DJs and singers Flicks works with, sometimes remotely and sometimes side by side in the studio.

Rob Lamothe, a Dunnville musician who provided backing vocals on several tracks on Genuine, praised Flicks’ direct writing style.

“He doesn’t mess around. He just says what he sees, what he feels,” Lamothe said. “Brent knew that at 18, when I met him. Just write real – simple and real.”

The pair met three years ago at Jukasa, the recording studio on Six Nations, and co-wrote the single “Pray for a Better Day,” which was nominated for an American Songwriting Award.

“It just felt super easy,” Lamothe said of working with Flicks, who has contributed lyrics to some tracks on Lamothe’s upcoming album.

“We had a good connection. You were very open to my differences,” Flicks told him.

“We’re all different in some ways,” Lamothe replied. “Maybe yours is more visual.”

Flicks said that like anyone, he has good days and bad. But he steadfastly refuses to use his illness as an excuse to stay silent when he has something to sing about.

“I always give 110 per cent, whatever that works out for me, and try to make a difference,” he said. “My job is to change opinions.”

B-FLIX drops sophomore album

Boston rapper debuts Genuine at Simcoe rec centre

News Nov 13, 2015 by J.P. Antonacci Norfolk News

B-FLIX is back.

The Boston rapper, also known as 22-year-old Brent Flicks, has a new album and a new tattoo, both of which were on display at the rec centre in Simcoe Saturday night.

The album, Genuine, delivers 14 tracks that showcase Flicks’ hip-hop/R&B sensibilities while conveying his raw take on social justice issues and his personal struggles with spinal muscular atrophy.

The tattoo, on his left hand, is the word “breathe,” the B rendered as a stylized musical note.

“I breathe music,” Flicks said, explaining that his condition – which has forced him to use a wheelchair since the age of three – can make breathing difficult.

“(The tattoo) kinda reminds me that as long as I’m breathing, I can do music.”

His music tells his story of not letting a degenerative disease derail his passion.

“It was from the heart,” Flicks said of Genuine, which is available now on iTunes and through bflix.ca.

“All my music is just my hopes and dreams, where I’ve been and where I hope to be. Some people have said it really makes them think and gives them a different perspective.”

His debut album, Everything Changed, scored Flicks a Hamilton Music Award nomination for rap/hip-hop recording of the year, and an invite to join a hip hop showcase at Club Absinthe in Hamilton before the awards night in May.

Flicks takes the accolades in stride. “Music gives me something to focus on. It gives me some sort of purpose, at whatever level it is,” he said.

His career has also introduced him to a wider circle of musicians, such as producer Shane McCurdy and the many DJs and singers Flicks works with, sometimes remotely and sometimes side by side in the studio.

Rob Lamothe, a Dunnville musician who provided backing vocals on several tracks on Genuine, praised Flicks’ direct writing style.

“He doesn’t mess around. He just says what he sees, what he feels,” Lamothe said. “Brent knew that at 18, when I met him. Just write real – simple and real.”

The pair met three years ago at Jukasa, the recording studio on Six Nations, and co-wrote the single “Pray for a Better Day,” which was nominated for an American Songwriting Award.

“It just felt super easy,” Lamothe said of working with Flicks, who has contributed lyrics to some tracks on Lamothe’s upcoming album.

“We had a good connection. You were very open to my differences,” Flicks told him.

“We’re all different in some ways,” Lamothe replied. “Maybe yours is more visual.”

Flicks said that like anyone, he has good days and bad. But he steadfastly refuses to use his illness as an excuse to stay silent when he has something to sing about.

“I always give 110 per cent, whatever that works out for me, and try to make a difference,” he said. “My job is to change opinions.”

B-FLIX drops sophomore album

Boston rapper debuts Genuine at Simcoe rec centre

News Nov 13, 2015 by J.P. Antonacci Norfolk News

B-FLIX is back.

The Boston rapper, also known as 22-year-old Brent Flicks, has a new album and a new tattoo, both of which were on display at the rec centre in Simcoe Saturday night.

The album, Genuine, delivers 14 tracks that showcase Flicks’ hip-hop/R&B sensibilities while conveying his raw take on social justice issues and his personal struggles with spinal muscular atrophy.

The tattoo, on his left hand, is the word “breathe,” the B rendered as a stylized musical note.

“I breathe music,” Flicks said, explaining that his condition – which has forced him to use a wheelchair since the age of three – can make breathing difficult.

“(The tattoo) kinda reminds me that as long as I’m breathing, I can do music.”

His music tells his story of not letting a degenerative disease derail his passion.

“It was from the heart,” Flicks said of Genuine, which is available now on iTunes and through bflix.ca.

“All my music is just my hopes and dreams, where I’ve been and where I hope to be. Some people have said it really makes them think and gives them a different perspective.”

His debut album, Everything Changed, scored Flicks a Hamilton Music Award nomination for rap/hip-hop recording of the year, and an invite to join a hip hop showcase at Club Absinthe in Hamilton before the awards night in May.

Flicks takes the accolades in stride. “Music gives me something to focus on. It gives me some sort of purpose, at whatever level it is,” he said.

His career has also introduced him to a wider circle of musicians, such as producer Shane McCurdy and the many DJs and singers Flicks works with, sometimes remotely and sometimes side by side in the studio.

Rob Lamothe, a Dunnville musician who provided backing vocals on several tracks on Genuine, praised Flicks’ direct writing style.

“He doesn’t mess around. He just says what he sees, what he feels,” Lamothe said. “Brent knew that at 18, when I met him. Just write real – simple and real.”

The pair met three years ago at Jukasa, the recording studio on Six Nations, and co-wrote the single “Pray for a Better Day,” which was nominated for an American Songwriting Award.

“It just felt super easy,” Lamothe said of working with Flicks, who has contributed lyrics to some tracks on Lamothe’s upcoming album.

“We had a good connection. You were very open to my differences,” Flicks told him.

“We’re all different in some ways,” Lamothe replied. “Maybe yours is more visual.”

Flicks said that like anyone, he has good days and bad. But he steadfastly refuses to use his illness as an excuse to stay silent when he has something to sing about.

“I always give 110 per cent, whatever that works out for me, and try to make a difference,” he said. “My job is to change opinions.”