Brewing close to the land

News Oct 30, 2016 by Jeff Tribe Norfolk News

If all goes according to plan, a new microbrewery near Walsh will open in time for visitors to raise a glass for Canada’s 150th birthday.

Norfolk councillors responded with an enthusiastic ‘cheers’ to a proposed closed-chain organic farm estate nano-brewery that makes local brews featuring ingredients sourced exclusively onsite.

“A very refreshing environmental approach I’m not certain I’ve ever heard of coming to council before,” said Coun. Peter Black during a recent meeting.

The Charlotteville Brewing Co. is a progression from the Carolinian Hop Yard, a four-acre, nine-variety hop-growing operation led by the husband and wife team of Tim Wilson and Melanie Doerksen.

The couple first approached council with the idea of a microbrewery in spring 2015, but were encouraged by planning staff to further develop the farm.

Having done so, they submitted an application for site-specific on-farm diversified use at 1207 Charlotteville West Quarter Line, namely a nano-brewery and restaurant with an outdoor patio.

The application included provision for events of up to 100 persons such as weddings, agricultural-related workshops and festivals, along with the sale of brewery and restaurant-related merchandise.

“We want to make sure it reflects us and our upbringing, not just big business,” said Wilson following the couple’s presentation to council.

He grew up on the Wilson home farm, attending school in Walsh and Port Dover before moving on through university at Waterloo, Western and Pittsburgh to his position as a dentistry professor at Western’s Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Doerksen attended school at St. Michael’s in Walsh and Simcoe Composite prior to culinary studies at institutions including George Brown and a work placement in Italy. Having received her Red Seal chef designation, she accepted a teaching position at Fanshawe College, where her 13-year career has included starting an artisanal culinary arts program.

The self-described Green Party member is a strong proponent of quality “slow food,” which she defines as good, clean and fair for people involved at all stages of its path from field to table.

“I’m not a tree hugger,” Doerksen clarified, “but I’m aware there is an environmental approach that needs to be taken.”

The broad concept for their microbrewery and restaurant is great food and craft beer, presented in a slightly different fashion than has been seen in the area.

The couple has already invested roughly $100,000 in dismantling and reassembling a pair of classic barns originally from Coldstream, north of London on the property. Containing 10-by-10-inch beams up to 56 feet long from another era, one is circa 1913 while the elder statesman 50 years older.

Wilson anticipates their presence will anchor the finished site’s intended agricultural panache and curb appeal.

“Although there are no curbs,” he added with a laugh.

The concept features an ecologically sound base fostered by the family farm’s location, cradled amongst three Long Point Region Conservation Authority woodlots and provincially significant wetlands.

“We have a lot of things to protect,” said Tim’s mother, Madaline.

Currently, Wilson and Doerksen produce close to 1,000 pounds of pellatized hops annually, which is enough to make 10,000 to 12,000 litres of beer.

“We soon realized we didn’t have enough family members to pick them by hand,” Wilson said with a laugh.

Tim’s scientific approach has been incorporated into hops production, and the couple’s international travel has also contributed to the mix, building respect for the value of clean, fresh earth and its produce, as well as whetting an enthusiastic culinary appetite.

“I love good food and good beer,” Doerksen explained.

Their plan is to initially hire a brew master, with Doerksen, who understands more than a little about palate and flavour profiles, eventually taking over.

In keeping with the older barn’s 150-year-history, Wilson’s goal is to have the facility open for business by July 1, 2017, in time for Canada’s sesquicentennial celebration.

Black praised the environmentally sensitive, organic approach toward the facility, adding he looks forward to seeing it develop and checking it out personally.

“I don’t know if they’ll make a lot of money, but they’ll make a lot of friends,” Black commented prior to council’s unanimous approval.

Brewing close to the land

The Charlotteville Brewing Co. looks to open brewery, restaurant near Walsh

News Oct 30, 2016 by Jeff Tribe Norfolk News

If all goes according to plan, a new microbrewery near Walsh will open in time for visitors to raise a glass for Canada’s 150th birthday.

Norfolk councillors responded with an enthusiastic ‘cheers’ to a proposed closed-chain organic farm estate nano-brewery that makes local brews featuring ingredients sourced exclusively onsite.

“A very refreshing environmental approach I’m not certain I’ve ever heard of coming to council before,” said Coun. Peter Black during a recent meeting.

The Charlotteville Brewing Co. is a progression from the Carolinian Hop Yard, a four-acre, nine-variety hop-growing operation led by the husband and wife team of Tim Wilson and Melanie Doerksen.

The couple first approached council with the idea of a microbrewery in spring 2015, but were encouraged by planning staff to further develop the farm.

Having done so, they submitted an application for site-specific on-farm diversified use at 1207 Charlotteville West Quarter Line, namely a nano-brewery and restaurant with an outdoor patio.

The application included provision for events of up to 100 persons such as weddings, agricultural-related workshops and festivals, along with the sale of brewery and restaurant-related merchandise.

“We want to make sure it reflects us and our upbringing, not just big business,” said Wilson following the couple’s presentation to council.

He grew up on the Wilson home farm, attending school in Walsh and Port Dover before moving on through university at Waterloo, Western and Pittsburgh to his position as a dentistry professor at Western’s Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Doerksen attended school at St. Michael’s in Walsh and Simcoe Composite prior to culinary studies at institutions including George Brown and a work placement in Italy. Having received her Red Seal chef designation, she accepted a teaching position at Fanshawe College, where her 13-year career has included starting an artisanal culinary arts program.

The self-described Green Party member is a strong proponent of quality “slow food,” which she defines as good, clean and fair for people involved at all stages of its path from field to table.

“I’m not a tree hugger,” Doerksen clarified, “but I’m aware there is an environmental approach that needs to be taken.”

The broad concept for their microbrewery and restaurant is great food and craft beer, presented in a slightly different fashion than has been seen in the area.

The couple has already invested roughly $100,000 in dismantling and reassembling a pair of classic barns originally from Coldstream, north of London on the property. Containing 10-by-10-inch beams up to 56 feet long from another era, one is circa 1913 while the elder statesman 50 years older.

Wilson anticipates their presence will anchor the finished site’s intended agricultural panache and curb appeal.

“Although there are no curbs,” he added with a laugh.

The concept features an ecologically sound base fostered by the family farm’s location, cradled amongst three Long Point Region Conservation Authority woodlots and provincially significant wetlands.

“We have a lot of things to protect,” said Tim’s mother, Madaline.

Currently, Wilson and Doerksen produce close to 1,000 pounds of pellatized hops annually, which is enough to make 10,000 to 12,000 litres of beer.

“We soon realized we didn’t have enough family members to pick them by hand,” Wilson said with a laugh.

Tim’s scientific approach has been incorporated into hops production, and the couple’s international travel has also contributed to the mix, building respect for the value of clean, fresh earth and its produce, as well as whetting an enthusiastic culinary appetite.

“I love good food and good beer,” Doerksen explained.

Their plan is to initially hire a brew master, with Doerksen, who understands more than a little about palate and flavour profiles, eventually taking over.

In keeping with the older barn’s 150-year-history, Wilson’s goal is to have the facility open for business by July 1, 2017, in time for Canada’s sesquicentennial celebration.

Black praised the environmentally sensitive, organic approach toward the facility, adding he looks forward to seeing it develop and checking it out personally.

“I don’t know if they’ll make a lot of money, but they’ll make a lot of friends,” Black commented prior to council’s unanimous approval.

Brewing close to the land

The Charlotteville Brewing Co. looks to open brewery, restaurant near Walsh

News Oct 30, 2016 by Jeff Tribe Norfolk News

If all goes according to plan, a new microbrewery near Walsh will open in time for visitors to raise a glass for Canada’s 150th birthday.

Norfolk councillors responded with an enthusiastic ‘cheers’ to a proposed closed-chain organic farm estate nano-brewery that makes local brews featuring ingredients sourced exclusively onsite.

“A very refreshing environmental approach I’m not certain I’ve ever heard of coming to council before,” said Coun. Peter Black during a recent meeting.

The Charlotteville Brewing Co. is a progression from the Carolinian Hop Yard, a four-acre, nine-variety hop-growing operation led by the husband and wife team of Tim Wilson and Melanie Doerksen.

The couple first approached council with the idea of a microbrewery in spring 2015, but were encouraged by planning staff to further develop the farm.

Having done so, they submitted an application for site-specific on-farm diversified use at 1207 Charlotteville West Quarter Line, namely a nano-brewery and restaurant with an outdoor patio.

The application included provision for events of up to 100 persons such as weddings, agricultural-related workshops and festivals, along with the sale of brewery and restaurant-related merchandise.

“We want to make sure it reflects us and our upbringing, not just big business,” said Wilson following the couple’s presentation to council.

He grew up on the Wilson home farm, attending school in Walsh and Port Dover before moving on through university at Waterloo, Western and Pittsburgh to his position as a dentistry professor at Western’s Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Doerksen attended school at St. Michael’s in Walsh and Simcoe Composite prior to culinary studies at institutions including George Brown and a work placement in Italy. Having received her Red Seal chef designation, she accepted a teaching position at Fanshawe College, where her 13-year career has included starting an artisanal culinary arts program.

The self-described Green Party member is a strong proponent of quality “slow food,” which she defines as good, clean and fair for people involved at all stages of its path from field to table.

“I’m not a tree hugger,” Doerksen clarified, “but I’m aware there is an environmental approach that needs to be taken.”

The broad concept for their microbrewery and restaurant is great food and craft beer, presented in a slightly different fashion than has been seen in the area.

The couple has already invested roughly $100,000 in dismantling and reassembling a pair of classic barns originally from Coldstream, north of London on the property. Containing 10-by-10-inch beams up to 56 feet long from another era, one is circa 1913 while the elder statesman 50 years older.

Wilson anticipates their presence will anchor the finished site’s intended agricultural panache and curb appeal.

“Although there are no curbs,” he added with a laugh.

The concept features an ecologically sound base fostered by the family farm’s location, cradled amongst three Long Point Region Conservation Authority woodlots and provincially significant wetlands.

“We have a lot of things to protect,” said Tim’s mother, Madaline.

Currently, Wilson and Doerksen produce close to 1,000 pounds of pellatized hops annually, which is enough to make 10,000 to 12,000 litres of beer.

“We soon realized we didn’t have enough family members to pick them by hand,” Wilson said with a laugh.

Tim’s scientific approach has been incorporated into hops production, and the couple’s international travel has also contributed to the mix, building respect for the value of clean, fresh earth and its produce, as well as whetting an enthusiastic culinary appetite.

“I love good food and good beer,” Doerksen explained.

Their plan is to initially hire a brew master, with Doerksen, who understands more than a little about palate and flavour profiles, eventually taking over.

In keeping with the older barn’s 150-year-history, Wilson’s goal is to have the facility open for business by July 1, 2017, in time for Canada’s sesquicentennial celebration.

Black praised the environmentally sensitive, organic approach toward the facility, adding he looks forward to seeing it develop and checking it out personally.

“I don’t know if they’ll make a lot of money, but they’ll make a lot of friends,” Black commented prior to council’s unanimous approval.